Microcogen.info/***/SOMRAD Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 19, 2014, 08:45:04 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
32574 Posts in 2543 Topics by 1107 Members
Latest Member: Mo
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Microcogen.info/***/SOMRAD Forums
|-+  Prime movers, diesel and gas engines
| |-+  Gas/Propane/Natural Gas Engines (Moderator: Tom T)
| | |-+  Natural gas carb?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: Natural gas carb?  (Read 9588 times)
BioHazard
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 903



View Profile
« on: January 15, 2011, 06:45:59 AM »

I hope to have a natural gas powered 4-6 cylinder engine going soon. What exactly needs to be done to a standard car engine to make it run on natural gas? Do I simply need a mixer like this one:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/IMPCO-LPG-PROPANE-CARBURETOR-MIXER-CA100-CA100-194-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem29f9d28285QQitemZ180284981893QQptZMotorsQ5fCarQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

Would I bolt that on top of the original gasoline carb or throttle body for throttle control?
Logged

Do engines get rewarded for their steam?
sailawayrb
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 847


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 12:01:54 PM »

Here's a site with some info you may find worthwhile:

http://www.propane-generators.com/

Bob B.
Logged
BioHazard
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 903



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 08:11:14 PM »

I've looked over that website before, though they seem kind of expensive.

This page shows how you basically just drill out the gasoline jet in the carb for a natural gas jet:
http://www.propane-generators.com/dedicated_kits.htm

What I don't understand...is what is this part?

I would guess that is a propane regulator, but, if you're using low pressure natural gas.....what's it for?
Logged

Do engines get rewarded for their steam?
vdubnut62
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1212



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2011, 08:49:59 PM »

I'm not an expert, and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night but....
I think it's a demand regulator, sort of like a regulator used for SCUBA diving.
If it does not sense a partial vacuum or demand, no gas flows.
Ron
Logged

When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny -- Thomas Jefferson
BioHazard
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 903



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2011, 09:51:27 PM »

I'm not an expert, and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night but....
I think it's a demand regulator, sort of like a regulator used for SCUBA diving.
If it does not sense a partial vacuum or demand, no gas flows.
Ron

Is that how the Impco mixer works? I get the idea they are meant to be put on top of carburetors for dual fuel use, even though I'm only interested in one fuel.

The auction says "THE MODEL 100 SERIES IS A SINGLE DIAPHRAGM AIR-GAS VALVE CARBURETOR/MIXER."
Logged

Do engines get rewarded for their steam?
billswan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 434


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2011, 10:07:08 PM »

I've looked over that website before, though they seem kind of expensive.

This page shows how you basically just drill out the gasoline jet in the carb for a natural gas jet:
http://www.propane-generators.com/dedicated_kits.htm

What I don't understand...is what is this part?

I would guess that is a propane regulator, but, if you're using low pressure natural gas.....what's it for?

Bio

It works as Vdubnut62 says no vacuum no propane flows to carb mixer. It also is a liquid propane vaporiser if you notice in the pix there are engine coolant lines to it. They take heat TO the regulator to get all the liquid propane converted to vapor.

Billswan
Logged

16/1 Metro DI at work 900rpm and 7000watts

10/1 Omega in a state of failure
billswan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 434


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2011, 10:13:55 PM »

I'm not an expert, and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night but....
I think it's a demand regulator, sort of like a regulator used for SCUBA diving.
If it does not sense a partial vacuum or demand, no gas flows.
Ron

Is that how the Impco mixer works? I get the idea they are meant to be put on top of carburetors for dual fuel use, even though I'm only interested in one fuel.

The auction says "THE MODEL 100 SERIES IS A SINGLE DIAPHRAGM AIR-GAS VALVE CARBURETOR/MIXER."

I see this unit does have a diaphragm but my GUESS is it needs other support to operate. Like a supply of propane Vapor probably from a heated regulator like your other post shows.

Billswan
Logged

16/1 Metro DI at work 900rpm and 7000watts

10/1 Omega in a state of failure
BioHazard
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 903



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2011, 10:20:24 PM »

I see this unit does have a diaphragm but my GUESS is it needs other support to operate. Like a supply of propane Vapor probably from a heated regulator like your other post shows.

Billswan

But do you need a regulator when you're running off of low pressure natural gas?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 03:42:18 AM by hwew » Logged

Do engines get rewarded for their steam?
hwew
SOMRAD
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1605



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2011, 03:42:39 AM »

I see this unit does have a diaphragm but my GUESS is it needs other support to operate. Like a supply of propane Vapor probably from a heated regulator like your other post shows.

Billswan

But do you need a regulator when you're running off of low pressure natural gas?

Yes,

Note: Natural gas and LPG regulars are differant. The same goes with the gas lines and ............ect.

Warning!!! If you do not know the required materials to use, the gas codes on how it should be plumbed and how to test water colume do not attempt the install. Get a licensed plumber.
Done it long enough enough to know LPG and Natural Gas is nothing to mess with if you do not know what you are doing. If somthing goes wrong you could be held liable.
In most states I beleive it is the gas company's job to run the proper gas line to the equipment that will be ran. And in some states they will supply the regulator. Most of the time this is done at the gas company's expense. Than all you need is a plumber to finish the job.

Henry
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 04:19:14 AM by hwew » Logged
hwew
SOMRAD
Hero Member
******
Posts: 1605



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2011, 03:59:45 AM »

Oh, once the install is completed. Please do not use a match to test for leaks. Roll Eyes

Henry
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 06:59:04 AM by hwew » Logged
billswan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 434


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2011, 05:50:16 AM »

I see this unit does have a diaphragm but my GUESS is it needs other support to operate. Like a supply of propane Vapor probably from a heated regulator like your other post shows.

Billswan

But do you need a regulator when you're running off of low pressure natural gas?

I totally agree with Hwew you need special regulators for natural gas.

Billswan
Logged

16/1 Metro DI at work 900rpm and 7000watts

10/1 Omega in a state of failure
AdeV
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 617



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2011, 08:28:12 AM »

Henry - do you know how to determine the "size" (in gas flow terms) of a propane demand valve? Our next door neighbours here have an ancient nissan-powered fork-lift truck, and something's gone wrong with the propane feed side, so it won't work any more. I reckon they need to replace the demand valve (because you can get it running with a squirt of "Start ya bastard" (ether)), but no gas is fed through. The valve is very similar to the one Bill showed a picture of.

If I could tell how big a demand valve is needed, I could replace it & get lots of free welding off them for moving what is, at the moment, a total deadweight.
Logged

Cheers!
Ade.
--------------
2x Lister CS 6/1 for off-grid power & heat,  Lister CS 3.7/1 compressor for kicks &  Lister JP4 (coming soon)
1x Bridgeport Milling machine
1x Edgwick Mk1 Lathe
0x life....
wrightkiller
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 94



View Profile
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2011, 09:18:00 AM »

Just for the record the line on the top of the regulator is{ gas out to the carb}...{.NOT }a coolant line. the gas line in is where the red cap is ......I have this setup on one of my geneartor ....and it is a  vacuum or demand    regulator       http://www.propane-generators.com/

PS. it is worth its weight in gold,  and good for propane and nat gas....

   
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 09:59:04 AM by wrightkiller » Logged
TimSR2
Full Member
***
Posts: 235


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2011, 12:19:55 PM »

Regulator housing looks the same for both fuels, but the spring settings and orifices differ. LPG is supplied at a higher pressure than NG. There is no cheap way around this, you need to buy the correct equipment for your application from a reputable company.
Logged
billswan
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 434


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2011, 12:55:04 PM »

Just for the record the line on the top of the regulator is{ gas out to the carb}...{.NOT }a coolant line. the gas line in is where the red cap is ......I have this setup on one of my geneartor ....and it is a  vacuum or demand    regulator       http://www.propane-generators.com/

PS. it is worth its weight in gold,  and good for propane and nat gas....

   

Yes better pix I stand corrected. I was thinking of an old case tractor and another piece of equipment I owned. A person would start them on vapor from the main tank and after the engine got warm and then you would turn on a liquid flow to the reg and turn off the vapor. That way the liquid would run the engine and the tank pressure would stay up. I was a 80 hp tractor and needed LOTS of propane. Pulling vapor would eventually lower tank pressure to the point it would no longer vaporize.

The regs in the pix look to run off vapor only. I got them confused.  Embarrassed

Billswan
Logged

16/1 Metro DI at work 900rpm and 7000watts

10/1 Omega in a state of failure
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!